An analysis of wb yeats poem leda and the swan

The poem's final question, however, is highly relevant to Yeats's ultimate meaning "Did she put on his knowledge with his power? So did the Dove-God's impregnation of Mary initiate the Christian age. The symbol of Leda is enriched by the previous poems, which focus upon Helen and the ruin of Troy.

Leda and the Swan by William Butler Yeats: Critical Appreciation

Critical Appreciation Yeats's Leda and the Swan is a sonnet based on Greek mythology, and one in which he interprets the rape of queen Leda by god Zeus as an incident of annunciation of a two thousand years' long phase of civilizational cycle in history.

But the sonnet does not borrow its power from the significance of the theme. Leda later gave birth to another girl named Clytemnestra who caused the tragedy of Agamemnon. The event proved a fateful one as it set in motion a whole chain of events.

After eight lines comes the volta or turn, where the previous lines are answered or a conclusion is drawn. Later on, on his return from the war to his country, Mycenae in Argos, Agamemnon was killed by his own wife Clytemnestra, who was also the daughter of Leda and Zeus Jupiter.

Yeats first dramatically presents the moment of the mythical rape of a Greek queen Leda by god Zeus in the form of a wild swan; then he goes on to contemplate its significance and consequence. After the description and meditation about the rape in the octave, the poet makes a claim that the conception was the seed of destruction and not of knowledge and wisdom.

Yeats For Yeats, this was the annunciation announcement or marking point of the whole era of destruction of a civilization especially in the Trojan War. Yeats wanted to evolve a system to believe and for this he turned to spiritualism, magic and occultism.

In this poem it is the brutal physical act that sets off a chain of events, divinely inspired it could be said, leading to all sorts of disruption and violence in human society. The diction is worth focusing on: Zeus is all powerful and intent on impregnating the helpless female, who seems unable to ward him off.

As well as giving birth to Helen of Troy, Leda will also conceive Clytemnestra, the wife of Agamemnon; Clytemnestra will later kill her husband, after the Trojan War, for sacrificing their daughter in exchange for fair winds from the gods.

Perhaps this is why the poet uses such dramatic language in the first eight lines of the poem. A shudder in the loins engenders there The broken wall, the burning roof and tower And Agamemnon dead. The real answer is beyond the merely logical categories of yes and no; since the real poem transcends the categories of the myths it utilizes to lead the reader to an inward vision.

Perhaps this is why the poet uses such dramatic language in the first eight lines of the poem. Being so caught up, So mastered by the brute blood of the air, Did she put on his knowledge with his power Before the indifferent beak could let her drop?

Her fingers of the hands were delicate and weak, and she was terrified enough, so she found herself unable to push off the big white bird with lots of feathers.

Leda and the Swan

He returned to Dublin at the age of fifteen to continue his education and study painting, but quickly discovered he preferred poetry.

Similarly, beautiful Clytemnestra killed her own husband. At least, this is one interpretation of Leda and the Swan. He was influenced by Mohine Chatterjee, a theosophist. The poem is beautiful in its descriptive narrative of sexual union also. The poem, which somewhat unusually for Yeats is a sonnet, is about the rape of the Greek girl Leda by the god Zeus, who has assumed the form of a swan.

Leda and the Swan - Petrarchan Sonnet Form Leda and the Swan is a Petrarchan sonnet with a rhyme scheme of abab cdcd efg efg and has 14 lines one of which is split, so officially it has 15 lines and is mostly iambic pentameter in rhythm. So Leda is responsible indirectly for all that follows because she gave birth to Helen, who caused the Trojan War when abducted from her husband Menelaus by Paris.Analysis of Leda and the Swan eda and the Swan is based on the well known ancient Greek myth in which Zeus takes the form of a swan in order to make love to Leda, wife of Tyndareus, King of Sparta, who also happens to lay with her that very night.

Published in Yeats’ collection of Later Poems inLeda and the Swan is a sonnet based on a myth from Greek mythology. According to Greek myth, Leda was the mother of mankind. According to Greek myth, Leda was the mother of mankind.

When Yeats wrote this poem inmost of his readers would have been familiar with the story of Leda and the Swan.

Nowadays, it helps to have a good online encyclopedia to help out with referenc. Leda and the Swan by William Butler Yeats: Summary The poem Leda and the Swan by William Butler Yeats shows how Leda was being raped by Zeus in the form of a wild swan and how this copulation led to the destruction of the city of the Troy.

Poems of W.B. Yeats: The Tower study guide contains a biography of William Butler Yeats, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis. Poems of W.B. Yeats: The Tower Summary and Analysis of Leda and the Swan. Buy Study Guide. A sudden hit from above, and the swan’s wings beat above the girl.

His webbed feet. The poem is a Petrarchan sonnet, a form usually associated with love and romance, yet here used controversially by Yeats.

The story of Leda and the Swan comes from ancient Greek mythology. Zeus, the Father of the Olympian Gods, took the form of a swan in .

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An analysis of wb yeats poem leda and the swan
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